Max PINCKERS

Margins of Excess - ONLY FOUR SIGNED COPIES LEFT!


€ 55,00
inkl. MwSt., zzgl. Versand

 

"In 'Margins of Excess' (2018) the notion of how personal imagination conflicts with generally accepted beliefs is expressed through the narratives of six individuals.
Every one of them momentarily received nationwide attention in the US press because of their attempts to realize a dream or passion, but were presented as frauds or deceivers by the mass media’s apparent incapacity to deal with idiosyncratic versions of reality.

Herman Rosenblat became well-known because of a self-invented love-story set in a concentration camp during WWII, the private detective Jay J. Armes appears to be a real-life superhero, Darius McCollum drew media attention by compulsively highjacking trains, Richard Heene would have staged an elaborate television hoax, Rachel Doležal would have pretended to be ‘black’, and Ali Alqaisi would have tried to make people believe that he was the ‘hooded man’ in the iconic photo from Abu Ghraib prison.

'Margins of Excess' weaves together their stories through personal interviews, press articles, archival footage and staged photographs.
The current era of ‘post-truth’, in which truths, half-truths, lies, fiction or entertainment are easily interchanged, has produced a culture of ‘hyper-individual truths’, demanding a new approach to identify the underlying narratives that structure our perception of reality in a world where there is no longer a generally accepted frame of realism. Embedding the stories of the six main protagonists into a clustering tale of cloned military dogs, religious apparitions, suspect vehicles, fake terrorist plots, accidental bombings and fictional presidents, this book follows an associative logic akin to the indiscriminate way a paranoid mind connects unrelated events, or the hysteria of the 24-second news cycle.

In 'Margins of Excess' reality and fiction are intertwined. Not to fool us, but to reveal a more intricate view of our world, which takes into account the subjective and fictitious nature of the categories we use to perceive and define it. And then again: not to celebrate superficiality and contingency, but to pierce through the noise, buzz, pulp, lies, dreams, paranoia, cynicism and laziness and to embrace ‘reality’ in all its complexity.

"Tropes. 'Margins of Excess’ is dedicated to a question that has always fascinated Pinckers, namely how people sculpt their own identity, starting from collective dreams and desires that are partly fed and shaped by the tropes of mass media. This question is linked to the media’s apparent incapacity to transmit intimate or idiosyncratic versions of reality.
The book has a woven structure. Artificially lit and staged ‘documentary’ photographs are combined with ‘abstract’ photographs, found footage, images distilled from the media, documents, articles from the press and self-conducted interviews. All these elements are approached differently on the level of the graphic design (different paper, compositions, formats, ways of binding) resulting in a readable visual rhythm which allows us to simultaneously differentiate and associate all these pieces of information.

Six stories. ‘Margins of Excess’ is spun around the stories of six people who momentarily received nationwide attention in the US press because of their attempts to realize a dream or passion, but were treated as deceivers. In general, Pinckers is attracted to subjects that evoke the magic of imagination but simultaneously reveal the impossibility of an untainted personal dream: time and again we discover that the words and images we use to define ourselves have been unconsciously borrowed from others, from the past, from books, paintings, the internet or the media.
Herman Rosenblat became well-known because of a self-invented love-story set in a concentration camp during WWII, the private detective Jay J. Armes appears to be a real-life superhero, Darius McCollum drew media attention by compulsively highjacking trains, Richard Heene would have staged an elaborate television hoax, Rachel Doležal would have pretended to be ‘black’ and Ali Alqaisi would have tried to make people believe that he was the ‘hooded man’ in the iconic photo from Abu Ghraib prison. Pinckers has met with all of them to hear their view of things and documented their story with found footage, published articles, self-made interviews and artificially lit and staged photographs.
These six stories, each forming a separate chapter, are linked by other recurrent themes such as fear, superstition, the visibility of minorities, the way individuals try to represent themselves by specific hairdo, clothes, tattoos, make up and the decoration of their surroundings or the manner in which Native Americans, western motel rooms and terrorist attacks are represented in museums. Another subject is an ongoing story about suspicious vehicles which, due to the omnipresence of cars in the US (and in these photographs), tends to become hilarious.

False narratives. Some of the photographs have been ‘misplaced’ to suggest a false narrative. For instance, the story about the train-buff Darius McCollum is ‘documented’ by a photograph that seems to show the control station of a public transportation system, whereas in reality we are seeing a simulator for people who are learning to steer a ship. On one page, we might find an actual photograph of an aircraft designed by Richard Heene as it has been shown on television, on another page we find a photograph of a fake UFO launched by Pinckers himself. On one page we are witnessing real policemen arresting somebody, on another page a person who seems to be shot is actually a doll in a war museum. Meeting with the private detective Jay J. Armes, we might have the impression that he is an action figure come alive. But seeing the two portraits Pinckers made of him, he reminds us of a figure in a wax museum or a stuffed animal in a diorama. Several photographs in this book were taken in museums, for instance war museums, which are prolific in the US. But when we believe we see a fake orange cab, reminding us of the paint scene in the movie Taxi Driver, we are actually seeing a real one being repainted. Sometimes we see a studio with a green key, sometimes we see a green wall suggesting a staged ‘reality’.

In his documentary ‘HyperNormalisation’ (2016) Adam Curtis argues that contemporary political figures deliberately tell lies and mix facts and fiction to create a climate of intellectual insecurity. In ‘Margins of Excess’ this concept of ‘perception management’ is linked to how museums represent events, television studios and motel rooms are decorated, news is fabricated and people shape themselves according to their fears, dreams and expectations. We all need forms, shapes, words and images to cope with reality, but we should keep in mind that they never completely represent reality and that this doesn’t mean that reality is nonexistent. Ideally, we might conclude, words would continually remind us they are but words. And this is precisely what Pinckers intends his photographs to do by infusing them with manifest artificial elements.

Another recurrent topic in PINCKERS’ work is the photographer’s unconscious tendency to make photographs that look like existing photographs or paintings. Earlier this year this led him to develop the Trophy Camera v0.9 (in collaboration with Dries Depoorter).
Being able to identify patterns derived from World Press Photos of the Year (from 1955 to the present), this camera is able to recognize, take and save award winning photographs, which are automatically uploaded to a website. In a similar way, photographers are inclined to take photographs that look like photographs or paintings we have seen before and which have moved us. Without really revealing something or making it present, they remind us of what we are supposed to feel or think with regard to a certain subject.
For ‘Margins of Excess’ this photographer’s tic to recreate clichés has been translated into a series of ‘classic’ photographs pretending to depict the sorrow of an individual. Each chapter contains one of these photographs in which we meet upset, weeping individuals, impersonated by professional actors. The more we leaf through the book, however, the more these professional mourners start to represent our own dismay. We know they are acting, but we don’t care anymore. Our disbelief is suspended. They have become real. As an ancient Greek choir they seem to weep in our stead, they seem to lament our fate, our fathers, our mothers and our children, our desperate attempts to be just.

Post-truth. The current era of ‘post-truth’, where truths, half-truths, lies, fiction or entertainment are easily interchangeable, has produced a culture of ‘hyper-individual truths’, demanding a new approach to identify underlying narratives that structure our perception of reality. Embedding the six main stories into a clustering tale of cloned military dogs, religious apparitions, suspect vehicles, fake terrorist plots, accidental bombings and fictional presidents, ‘Margins of Excess’ follows an associative logic akin to the indiscriminate way a paranoid mind connects unrelated events. As such, it mimics the hysteria of the 24-second news cycle and the one-dimensional formats of media that are primarily focused on selling ‘news’.

In ‘Margins of Excess’ reality and fiction are intertwined. Not to fool us, but to reveal a more intricate view of our world, which takes into account the subjective and fictitious nature of the categories we use to perceive and define it. And then again: not to celebrate superficiality and contingency, but to try to pierce through noise, buzz, pulp, lies, dreams, paranoia, cynicism and laziness and to embrace ‘reality’ in all its complexity.
Confronted with what he called ‘the vulgarity of the human heart’, which left him powerless, sad and desperate, Joseph Brodsky kept on believing in literature. On several occasions, he pleaded for a free or cheap distribution of millions of books, because he believed that the discovery of a book could save someone. To him, the power of literature resulted from being a fusion of Western (factual, rational) and Eastern (intuitive) thought. I believe he would have loved the simultaneously poetic and fact fed structure of ‘Margins of Excess’." (Hans Theys, Montagne de Miel, November 11th 2017, in: Margins of Excess: A new photographic essay by Max Pinckers)

With the support of the the Edward Steichen Award Luxembourg, the International Studio & Curatorial Program residency in New York and Vlaamse Gemeenschapscommissie Kunsten & Erfgoed. Max Pinckers is affiliated as a researcher to KASK / School of Arts of University College Ghent. Margins of Excess is part of his research project financed by the Arts Research Fund of University College Ghent, 2015-2021.

Reference texts & reviews:
Matthew Ponsford, CNN International, 2018
Kurt Snoekx, BRUZZ, Belgium, 2018
Kurt Snoekx, BRUZZ, Belgium, 2017
Hans Theys, H ART Magazine, Belgium, 2017

In 'Margins of Excess' (dt. etwa: Die Grenzen der Übertreibung) wird anhand von sechs Erzählungen dargestellt, wie die persönliche Vorstellungswelt mit allgemein akzeptierten Überzeugungen in Konflikt gerät.
Jede dargestellte Person erhielt in der US-Presse vorübergehend landesweite Aufmerksamkeit aufgrund ihrer Versuche, einen Traum oder eine Leidenschaft zu verwirklichen. Sie alle wurden jedoch von der offensichtlichen Unfähigkeit der Massenmedien, mit idiosynkratischen Versionen der Realität umzugehen, als Betrüger oder Betrüger dargestellt.

Herman Rosenblat wurde bekannt durch eine von ihm erfundene Liebesgeschichte in einem Konzentrationslager während des Zweiten Weltkrieges, der Privatdetektiv Jay J. Armes scheint ein echter Superheld zu sein, Darius McCollum zog die Aufmerksamkeit der Medien auf sich, indem er Züge zwanghaft entführte, Richard Heene hätte einen aufwändigen TV-Betrug inszeniert, Rachel Doležal hätte vorgetäuscht, 'schwarz' zu sein, und Ali Alqaisi hätte versucht, die Leute glauben zu machen, dass er der 'Kapuzenmann' auf dem ikonischen Foto aus Abu Ghraibs Gefängnis sei.

'Margins of Excess' verbindet ihre Geschichten mit Hilfe persönlicher Interviews, Presseartikeln, Archivaufnahmen und inszenierten Fotografien.
Die gegenwärtige Ära der 'Post-Wahrheit', in der Wahrheiten, Halbwahrheiten, Lügen, Fiktion oder Unterhaltung leicht miteinander vertauscht werden, hat eine Kultur von 'hyperindividuellen Wahrheiten' erzeugt, die einen neuen Ansatz zur Identifizierung der zugrunde liegenden Erzählstrukturen erfordern - unsere Wahrnehmung der Realität in einer Welt, in der es keinen allgemein akzeptierten Rahmen des Realismus mehr gibt.

'Margins of Excess' verbindet die Geschichten der sechs Hauptprotagonisten in einer Clustergeschichte von geklonten Militärhunden, religiösen Erscheinungen, verdächtigen Fahrzeugen, gefälschten terroristischen Anschlägen, zufälligen Bombenanschlägen und fiktiven Präsidenten und folgt einer assoziativen Logik, die der unterschiedslosen Art und Weise gleicht, wie ein paranoider Geist unzusammenhängende Ereignisse verbindet oder die Hysterie des 24-sekündigen Nachrichtenzyklus.

In 'Margins of Excess' sind Realität und Fiktion miteinander verflochten. Nicht, um uns zu täuschen, sondern um einen komplizierteren Blick auf unsere Welt zu werfen, der die subjektive und fiktive Natur der Kategorien berücksichtigt, die wir benutzen, um sie wahrzunehmen und zu definieren. Und dann noch einmal: Nicht die Oberflächlichkeit und Kontingenz zu zelebrieren, sondern den Lärm, das Summen, den Brei, die Lügen, die Träume, die Paranoia, den Zynismus und die Faulheit zu durchdringen und die 'Realität' in ihrer ganzen Komplexität zu erfassen.

"Tropen. 'Margins of Excess' ist einer Frage gewidmet, die PINCKERS schon immer fasziniert hat: nämlich wie Menschen ihre eigene Identität formen, ausgehend von kollektiven Träumen und Wünschen, die teilweise von den Massen der Massenmedien gespeist und geprägt werden. Diese Frage ist verknüpft der offensichtlichen Unfähigkeit der Medien, intime oder idiosynkratische Versionen der Realität zu übermitteln.
'Margins of Excess' hat eine gewebte Struktur. Künstlich beleuchtete und inszenierte 'dokumentarische' Fotografien werden mit 'abstrakten"' Fotografien, Found Footage, Bildern aus den Medien, Dokumenten, Presseartikeln und selbst durchgeführten Interviews kombiniert.
All diese Elemente werden auf der Ebene des graphischen Designs (verschiedene Papiere, Kompositionen, Formate, Bindungsarten) unterschiedlich angegangen, was zu einem lesbaren visuellen Rhythmus führt, der es uns ermöglicht, alle diese Informationen gleichzeitig zu differenzieren und zu assoziieren.

Sechs Geschichten. 'Margins of Excess' ist um die Geschichten von sechs Menschen herum gesponnen, die in der US-Presse wegen ihrer Versuche, einen Traum oder eine Leidenschaft zu verwirklichen, momentan landesweite Aufmerksamkeit erhielten, aber als Betrüger behandelt wurden. Im Allgemeinen fühlt sich PINCKERS zu Themen hingezogen, die den Zauber der Imagination hervorrufen, aber gleichzeitig die Unmöglichkeit eines unbefleckten persönlichen Traums offenbaren: immer wieder entdecken wir, dass die Worte und Bilder, mit denen wir uns definieren, unbewusst von anderen, aus der Vergangenheit, ausgeliehen wurden aus Büchern, Gemälden, dem Internet oder den Medien.

PINCKERS hat sich mit allen dargestellten Personen getroffen, um ihre Sicht der Dinge zu hören und ihre Geschichte mit Found Footage, veröffentlichten Artikeln, selbst erstellten Interviews und künstlich beleuchteten und inszenierten Fotografien zu dokumentieren.
Diese sechs Geschichten, die jeweils ein eigenes Kapitel bilden, sind durch andere wiederkehrende Themen wie Angst, Aberglaube, die Sichtbarkeit von Minderheiten, die Art und Weise, wie Individuen sich durch bestimmte Frisur, Kleidung, Tattoos, Make-up und die Dekoration ihrer Umgebung darstellen, verbunden oder die Art und Weise, in der Indianer, westliche Motelzimmer und Terroranschläge in Museen vertreten sind. Ein anderes Thema ist eine fortlaufende Geschichte über verdächtige Fahrzeuge, die aufgrund der Omnipräsenz von Autos in den USA (und auf diesen Fotos) dazu neigen, urkomisch zu werden.

Falsche Erzählungen
Einige der Fotografien wurden 'verlegt', um eine falsche Erzählung vorzuschlagen. Zum Beispiel wird die Geschichte über den Train-Buff Darius McCollum durch ein Foto 'dokumentiert', das die Kontrollstation eines öffentlichen Transportsystems zu zeigen scheint, während wir in Wirklichkeit einen Simulator für Leute sehen, die lernen, ein Schiff zu steuern.
Auf einer Seite finden wir vielleicht ein Foto von einem Flugzeug, das von Richard Heene entworfen wurde, wie es im Fernsehen gezeigt wurde, auf einer anderen Seite finden wir ein Foto von einem gefälschten UFO, das von PINCKERS selbst auf den Markt gebracht wurde. Auf einer Seite sehen wir echte Polizisten, die jemanden festnehmen, auf einer anderen Seite ist eine Person, die erschossen zu werden scheint - tatsächlich handelt es sich um eine Puppe in einem Kriegsmuseum.
Treffen wir uns mit dem Privatdetektiv Jay J. Armes, haben wir den Eindruck, dass er eine Actionfigur ist, die lebendig wird. Aber wenn er die beiden Portraits sieht, die PINCKERS von ihm gemacht hat, erinnert er uns an eine Figur in einem Wachsmuseum oder ein Stofftier in einem Diorama.
Mehrere Fotos in diesem Buch wurden in Museen gemacht, zum Beispiel Kriegsmuseen, die in den USA existieren. Aber wenn wir glauben, dass wir ein falsches orangefarbenes Taxi sehen, das uns an die Lackszene in dem Film 'Taxi Driver' erinnert, sehen wir tatsächlich, dass ein echter Lack neu lackiert wird. Manchmal sehen wir ein Studio mit einem grünen Schlüssel, manchmal sehen wir eine grüne Wand, die eine inszenierte 'Realität' suggeriert.

In seinem Dokumentarfilm 'HyperNormalisierung' (2016) argumentiert Adam Curtis, dass zeitgenössische politische Figuren absichtlich Lügen erzählen und Fakten und Fiktion mischen, um ein Klima der intellektuellen Unsicherheit zu schaffen. In 'Margins of Excess' ist dieses Konzept des 'Wahrnehmungsmanagements' damit verbunden, dass Museen Ereignisse darstellen, Fernsehstudios und Motelzimmer dekoriert werden, Nachrichten erfunden werden und Menschen sich entsprechend ihren Ängsten, Träumen und Erwartungen formen.
Wir alle brauchen Formen, Worte und Bilder, um mit der Realität fertig zu werden, aber wir sollten im Hinterkopf behalten, dass sie die Realität niemals vollständig repräsentieren und dass dies nicht bedeutet, dass die Realität nicht existiert. Idealerweise könnten wir schließen, dass Worte uns immer wieder daran erinnern, dass sie nur Worte sind.
Und genau das will PINCKERS seinen Fotografien tun, indem er sie mit manifesten künstlichen Elementen durchzieht.

Ein weiteres wiederkehrendes Thema in PINCKERS' Arbeit ist die unbewusste Tendenz des Fotografen, Fotografien zu machen, die wie existierende Fotografien oder Gemälde aussehen.
Anfang des Jahres führte ihn dies zur Entwicklung der Trophy Camera v0.9 (in Zusammenarbeit mit Dries Depoorter). Diese ist in der Lage ist, Muster zu erkennen, die von den Fotos der Weltpresse des Jahres (von 1955 bis heute) abgeleitet wurden. Sie kann preisgekrönte Fotos erkennen, aufnehmen und speichern und automatisch auf eine Website hochgeladen werden.
In ähnlicher Weise neigen Fotografen dazu, Fotos zu machen, die wie Fotografien oder Gemälde aussehen, die wir vorher gesehen haben und die uns bewegt haben. Ohne etwas wirklich zu enthüllen oder zu präsentieren, erinnern sie uns daran, was wir in Bezug auf ein bestimmtes Thema fühlen oder denken sollen.

Für 'Margins of Excess' wurde der Tic dieses Fotografen, Klischees zu reproduzieren, in eine Reihe 'klassischer' Fotografien übersetzt, die vorgaben, das Leid eines Individuums darzustellen. Jedes Kapitel enthält eine dieser Fotografien, in der wir verstörte, weinende Individuen kennen lernen, die von professionellen Schauspielern verkörpert werden.
Je mehr wir jedoch durch das Buch blättern, desto mehr beginnen diese professionellen Trauernden unsere eigene Bestürzung darzustellen. Wir wissen, dass sie handeln, aber uns ist das egal. Unser Unglaube ist aufgehoben. Sie sind real geworden. Als ein alter griechischer Chor scheinen sie an unserer Stelle zu weinen, sie scheinen unser Schicksal zu beklagen, unsere Väter, unsere Mütter und unsere Kinder, unsere verzweifelten Versuche, gerecht zu sein.

Post-Wahrheit. Das gegenwärtige Zeitalter des 'Post-Faktischen', wo Wahrheiten, Halbwahrheiten, Lügen, Fiktion oder Unterhaltung leicht austauschbar sind, hat eine Kultur von 'hyperindividuellen Wahrheiten' hervor gebracht, die einen neuen Ansatz erfordern, um zugrunde liegende Erzählungen zu identifizieren, die unsere Wahrnehmung strukturieren der Realität.
Indem PINCKERS die sechs Hauptgeschichten in eine Clustergeschichte von geklonten Militärhunden, religiösen Erscheinungen, verdächtigen Fahrzeugen, gefälschten terroristischen Anschlägen, zufälligen Bombenanschlägen und fiktiven Präsidenten einbindet, folgt 'Margin of Excess' einer assoziativen Logik, die der unterschiedslosen Art und Weise gleicht, wie ein paranoider Geist unzusammenhängende Ereignisse verbindet.
Als solches ahmt es die Hysterie des 24-sekündigen Nachrichtenzyklus und der eindimensionalen Formate von Medien nach, die sich in erster Linie auf den Verkauf von 'Nachrichten' konzentrieren.

In 'Margins of Excess' sind Realität und Fiktion miteinander verflochten. Nicht, um uns zu täuschen, sondern um einen komplizierteren Blick auf unsere Welt zu werfen, der die subjektive und fiktive Natur der Kategorien berücksichtigt, die wir benutzen, um sie wahrzunehmen und zu definieren. Und dann noch einmal: Nicht um Oberflächlichkeit und Kontingenz zu zelebrieren, sondern um zu versuchen durch Lärm, Summen, Brei, Lügen, Träume, Paranoia, Zynismus und Faulheit zu stechen und die 'Realität' in all ihrer Komplexität zu umarmen.

Konfrontiert mit dem, was er die 'Gemeinheit des menschlichen Herzens' nannte, die ihn machtlos, traurig und verzweifelt machte, glaubte Joseph BRODSKY weiterhin an die Literatur. Bei mehreren Gelegenheiten plädierte er für eine kostenlose oder billige Verteilung von Millionen von Büchern, weil er glaubte, dass die Entdeckung eines Buches jemanden retten könnte.
Für ihn ist die Kraft der Literatur eine Fusion von westlichem (sachlichem, rationalem) und östlichem (intuitiven) Denken. Ich glaube, er hätte die gleichzeitig poetische und faktengespeiste Struktur von 'Margins of Excess' geliebt." (frei übersetzter text von Hans Theys, Montagne de Miel, am 11. November 2017)