Zhu MO

Bright, bright day


€ 55,00
inkl. MwSt., zzgl. Versand

 

Video: https://vimeo.com/104493771 (by photobookstore.co.uk, thank you)

“Nostalgia! I even feel it for people and things that were nothing to me, because time’s fleeing is for me anguish, and life’s mystery is a torture. Faces I habitually see on my habitual streets - if I stop seeing them I become sad. And they were nothing to me, except perhaps the symbol of all of life.
The nondescript old man with dirty gaiters who often crossed my path at nine-thirty in the morning…The crippled sleet of lottery tickets who would pester me in vain…The round and ruddy old man smoking a cigar at the door of the tobacco shop… The pale tobacco shop owner…What has happened to them all, who because I regularly saw them were a part of my life? Tomorrow I too - I this soul that feels and thinks, this universe I am for myself - yes, tomorrow I too will be the one who no longer walks these streets, whom others will vaguely evoke with a ‘What’s become of him?’. And everything I’ve done, everything I’ve felt and everything I’ve lived will amount merely to one less passer-by on the everyday streets of some city or other." (Original text: © Fernando PESSOA, 'The Book of Disquiet')

"Zhu Mo’s 'Bright, Bright Day' series was selected in the 2012 Three Shadows Photography Award and attended the First Beijing Photo Biennial. We chose large format for this photobook after trying many possibilities to make the papers as walls and the book as a space, bringing a subtle oriental feeling like Yūgen in each picture and between spreads.
The English name of this photobook was quoted from the Polaroid book of Zhu Mo’s favorite Russian filmmaker TARKIOVSKY (and his film The Mirror‘s original script had the same title). The series trys to convey the same power from lights in darkness. The series also reminds me of a haiku poem in Akira Kurosawa’s memorial 'Something Like an Autobiography': 'The quiet water from the source, became rip currents, at the falls from the high'." (publisher's note, © Jiazazhi, 2014)

"Influenced by Andrei TARKOVSKY’s collection of polaroids and the works of Fernando Pessoa, Zhu MO’s photo book 'Bright, Bright Day' is a compilation of various mosaic-like snapshots of friends, landscapes and family.
The softly focused images of black and white beaches and color photographs create a world which is both visually poetic and inescapably fragile, presenting a narrative filled with the romanticisms of life and death, delicately held and viewed back in the forms of faded memories and intimate nostalgia." (© shashasha, 2014)

朱墨的《空日》系列曾在2012年入围三影堂摄影奖,2013年参加首届北京摄影国际双年展。这本画册,我们在尝试了多种可能性以后最终选择了一个大开本,试图将纸当作一面墙,将书当作一个空间,希望每一个跨页内的照片以及跨页与跨页之间产生某种琢磨不定的东方式的幽玄情绪。这本书是朱墨短暂的摄影创作生涯的回望,也是朱墨对摄影这个创作媒介的再思考。本书的英文译名“Bright, bright day”引用自朱墨喜爱的前苏联导演塔可夫斯基的同名画册(同时也是电影《镜子》原著剧本的标题),《空日》试图传达的正是同样的幽暗之光的力量。这组作品也让人联想起黑泽明自传《蛤蟆的油》里提到的一首俳句:瀑布来自高处,源头之水皆平静,到此成激流。

Video: https://vimeo.com/104493771 (by photobookstore.co.uk, thank you)

"Dem großformatigen Buch des chinesischen Fotografen Zhu MO ist eine Text-Passage aus Fernando Pessoas Buch 'The Book of Disquiet' (dt.: Das Buch der Unruhe) voran gestellt.
Zudem weist der Titel des Fotobuchs auf Arbeiten des russischen Filmschaffenden Andrej TARKOVSKY und seine bereits veröffentlichten Polaroid-Aufmnahmen hin.

Dies scheint der Kosmos zu sein, in dem sich Zhu MO bewegt und daher ist es auch nicht überraschend, dass sich sein Buch als peotisches Gesamtwerk versteht.
Die abfotografierten Originalprints mit Schattenwirkung sind scheinbar viel zu kleinformatig angeordnet; es hat den Eindruck, als würden hier Fotos auf einer Milchglasfläche hin- und her geschoben und immer wieder aufgehoben, um sie noch einmal zu betrachten und neu anzuordnen.
Dieses Spiel ähnelt einem Gedankenspiel mit Erinnerungen, die kommen und gehen und näher betrachtet werden.

Bis ich die deutsche Übersetzung der folgenden Passage aus Fernando Pessoas 'Buch der Unruhe' gefunden habe, gebe ich hier die Zhu MO's Fotografien voran gestellte englische Übersetzung wider:

'Nostalgia! I even feel it for people and things that were nothing to me, because time’s fleeing is for me anguish, and life’s mystery is a torture. Faces I habitually see on my habitual streets - if I stop seeing them I become sad. And they were nothing to me, except perhaps the symbol of all of life.
The nondescript old man with dirty gaiters who often crossed my path at nine-thirty in the morning…The crippled sleet of lottery tickets who would pester me in vain…The round and ruddy old man smoking a cigar at the door of the tobacco shop… The pale tobacco shop owner…What has happened to them all, who because I regularly saw them were a part of my life? Tomorrow I too - I this soul that feels and thinks, this universe I am for myself - yes, tomorrow I too will be the one who no longer walks these streets, whom others will vaguely evoke with a ‘What’s become of him?’. And everything I’ve done, everything I’ve felt and everything I’ve lived will amount merely to one less passer-by on the everyday streets of some city or other.'" (Originaltext: © Fernando PESSOA, 'The Book of Disquiet')" (© Richard G. SPORLEDER)